FAQs About SSDI

FAQs About SSDI

If you have more questions about SSDI benefits, hopefully the following provides some answers. If not, contact a SSDI attorney serving Charlotte as soon as possible.

  • Can I return to work if I a receiving SSDI benefits? One of the most common questions that individuals have when they are SSDI benefit recipients is whether or not they are allowed to return to work. The answer is yes – you can return to work while receiving SSDI benefits. In fact, the Social Security Administration has even developed trial work periods that last for nine months’ time and which are designed to help disabled workers transfer back into employment.
  • What is the ticket to work program? One way that you can transition back into the workforce after becoming disabled is by joining the ticket to work program, run by the Social Security Administration. The ticket to work program is 100 percent free to join, as well as 100 percent voluntary; there is no obligation to join the program if you are receiving SSDI/SSI benefits. The program provides you assistance in finding a job and obtaining vocational training, with the ultimate goal of you becoming more financially independent.
  • Where do I apply for SSDI in North Carolina? There are multiple offices in which you can apply for SSDI in North Carolina (you can also apply for benefits only if that is more convenient). The Charlotte office is located at 2201 Coronation Blvd, Suite 100 Charlotte NC 28227. See the full list of offices here. You can appear at a local office, at which time they will make you an appointment for an in person or telephone interview; you can call 1 800 772 1212 and schedule either an in office interview or telephone interview or you can apply online at ssa.gov. On the main page go to online services.
  • How long does it take for benefits to start? How long a claim takes to process varies on a case-by-case basis – some claims may be approved within a few months, whereas others may take years. If you are eligible for Social Security disability benefits, there is a five-month waiting period before your benefits can begin. You are eligible for benefits from the sixth full month from when your disability began (disability date), not from the date that your application was approved. In many cases, then, you may be entitled to back pay. Retroactive benefits are only paid one year preceding the application date, regardless of the disability date.
  • How do other benefit types affect my Social Security disability benefits? It is not uncommon for a disabled worker to qualify for more than one benefits type, such as unemployment benefits or workers’ compensation insurance benefits. In the event that you receive another benefit type, the amount of Social Security disability benefits that you receive may be reduced.
  • Are my Social Security benefits taxable? Whether or not you will have to pay taxes on your Social Security benefits is dependent upon your income level, but for most people, SSDI/SSI benefits are not considered taxable income. You will have to pay income tax on your Social Security benefits in the event that you have another form of substantial income. If you are filing your taxes as an individual, and your reported income is between $25,000 and $34,000, you may have to pay up to 50 percent of your benefits; if your reported income as an individual is greater than $34,000, you may have to pay up to 85 percent of your benefit amount. For couples, the income threshold is greater – if you are filing a joint tax return, you will need to pay taxes if joint income is about $32,000 (the more you make, the more taxes you will pay). If your income is below these thresholds, then your benefits are tax exempt.

If you have more questions, see the IRS Publication 915 Social Security & equalivent Railroad Retirement Benefits.